I-751 Waiver Extreme hardship to you
if returned to country of origin

This is known to be the most difficult to qualify for, but Tsang and Associates will help you show extreme hardship

You must show that political or economic changes have arisen in your country since the time you became a conditional resident that would cause you extreme hardship if you were to return. (See I.N.A. § 214(c)(4)(a); 8 U.S.C. § 1186a(c)(4)(a).)

While the following is not an exhaustive list, you may qualify if:

You have lived in the U.S. for an extended period of time. If you have spent a great deal of your life in the U.S. and you do not have any family or ties in your home country, or if all of your family resides in the U.S., you should provide affidavits and other evidence to this effect.

You do not speak a language that is spoken in your home country. If you have spent a great deal of your life in the U.S. and you do not have any family or ties in your home country, or if all of your family resides in the U.S., you should provide affidavits and other evidence to this effect.

You have custody of your U.S. citizen children and they would need to accompany you to your home country. If you are the primary caregiver or custodial guardian of a U.S. citizen child and he or she would need to accompany you if you were deported, you should provide documents (birth certificate, absence of other relatives who could care for the child) that prove this. If your U.S. citizen child would have difficulty assimilating into the culture of your home country, would not receive adequate medical care or education, or does not speak the native language, make sure you gather documents that demonstrate this.

If you were removed from the U.S., your U.S. relatives would suffer without the income from your job. If you are working to provide income for your parents, dependents, or other family members who live legally in the U.S., this could be considered an adequate hardship for the purposes of a waiver.

You would not be able to find work outside the U.S. If it would be difficult to obtain employment in your home country due to poor economic conditions, discrimination, or a lack of jobs for people with your set of skills, provide evidence to this effect.

You have a medical issue that cannot be treated adequately abroad. If the quality of medical care in your country of origin is so poor that you would suffer health issues if you were deported, you should obtain a note from your treating physician and supply information about your medical condition or diagnosis.

The conditions in your country are such that you would experience persecution or discrimination. If you would experience extreme hardship in your home country due to your race, religion, political opinion, or membership in a social group, you should provide evidence that substantiates your status (a letter from your pastor, for example) and information that backs up your claim that people like you are persecuted or discriminated against.

Your U.S. citizen spouse was at fault in the breakdown of your relationship or you cannot find your spouse in order to file jointly. If you are unable to locate your U.S. citizen spouse, or your spouse abandoned you, committed adultery or otherwise contributed to the end of your relationship and refuses to file Form I-751 with you, you should state that in your petition.

You are unable to get a divorce or annulment due to religious or cultural beliefs. If this applies to you and you cannot file for a divorce waiver, you could provide this evidence to USCIS.